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Waste Business Journal Weekly News Bulletin: May 29-Jun. 4, 2003

Headlines...

  1. Ohio EPA Permits Major New Stark County Landfill Expansion
  2. Pennsylvania DEP Denies Landfill Permit Near State Park
  3. Landfill Still Taints Possible Los Angeles Stadium Site
  4. Toyota West Virginia Plant Achieves Zero Landfill Status
  5. Tennessee County Stops Construction On Unpermitted Landfill
  6. Arkansas Draws $10 Million From Landfill Fund
  7. Jacobs Engineering Wins Potential $240m Corps Of Engineers Contract
  8. Hi-Rise Recycling Announces New Line Of Vertical Balers

 

  1. Ohio EPA Permits Major New Stark County Landfill Expansion

    The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency has approved the major expansion of the Countywide Recycling and Disposal Facility landfill in southern Stark County. The landfill, operated by Republic Waste Services, will be permitted to expand horizontally and vertically from 88 to 170 acres, which would give the landfill 27.3 years' worth of space. The landfill is authorized to accept 7,000 tons of garbage a day, and that total remains unchanged...Read More »

  2. Pennsylvania DEP Denies Landfill Permit Near State Park

    The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection has denied a limestone quarrying company's plans to build a landfill next to McConnell's Mill State Park. The DEP indicated that Sechan Limestone Industries' application "has not demonstrated that the benefits of the proposed landfill clearly outweigh the harms." Sechan officials are reviewing the DEP's finding; DEP officials said that while the company can appeal the denial, the chances of the decision being overturned are small...Read More »

  3. Landfill Still Taints Possible Los Angeles Stadium Site

    A toxic waste landfill in Carlsbad, Calif. being considered for the second time in five years as a future professional football stadium still needs millions of dollars worth of cleanup work. From 1959 to 1964, Cal Compact Inc. used its 157 acres as a dump for household trash and industrial waste, including petrochemicals, paints, solvents, dyes, pesticides and herbicides. For years, the state has been supervising the removal of pollutants, but major work remains undone and could cost $26 million to $35 million, according to state officials and others. And once cleanup is completed, millions of dollars more will have to be spent to shore up the terrain for construction, and to build a clay or synthetic cap. Last week, the NFL authorized a $10 million option on the land, although the league passed on the site in 1999 and opted to build a stadium in Houston...Read More »

  4. Toyota West Virginia Plant Achieves Zero Landfill Status

    Toyota Motor Manufacturing in Putnam County has achieved a landmark achievement. The factory sends nothing, not even cafeteria scraps, to landfills. It is one of two Toyota factories in the United States to achieve zero landfill status, the other being in Buffalo. Company officials say the most difficult part of a zero landfill program is the details, from finding a location to recycle dust from grinding wheels to separating small amounts of steel from aluminum shavings when engine blocks are machined. Toyota has an environmental action plan calling for reducing total energy use by 15 percent by 2005. Some Toyota plants in Japan have already reduced use by 19 percent...Read More »

  5. Tennessee County Stops Construction On Unpermitted Landfill

    Clear cutting and construction has begun on a new landfill in Middle Tennessee, but apparently no one approved the project. The property was located on nearly 300 acres in Hickman County, near the village of Bucksnort (near Centerville). State law requires a public hearing and a vote of the commission before construction on a new landfill can begin. Hickman County Commissioners said they would seek a cease and desist order in court to stop any more construction on the property...Read More »

  6. Arkansas Draws $10 Million From Landfill Fund

    The state of Arkansas has drawn about $10 million from a landfill cleanup contingency fund, a move that has concerned local county officials. Landfills across the state contribute to the fund, which has a cap of $25 million. But with the withdrawal, it appears that landfills will have to pay into the fund indefinitely. County officials, some paying as much as $250,000 a year, are wondering about the fairness of the move, saying they had planned to use the money for other uses...Read More »

  7. Jacobs Engineering Wins Potential $240m Corps Of Engineers Contract

    Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (NYSE: JEC) will provide environmental remediation services for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers New England District. The five-year contract includes two options for a total of five additional years. The maximum contract value is $240 million. Under the Total Environmental Restoration Contract, Jacobs will provide comprehensive environmental remediation services at the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site, as well as various other sites within the geographic boundaries of the North Atlantic Division...Read More »

  8. Hi-Rise Recycling Announces New Line Of Vertical Balers

    Hi- Rise Recycling Companies has announced its new line of vertical balers. Hi-Rise's vertical balers feature heavy-duty construction, a maintenance- friendly electronics controls package, and advanced hydraulics. According to the company, the unit operates quietly, is less than 13' tall including the cylinder, and is easy to maintain. Three of the company's new balers, the HRC6030s, feature a full 30" vertical opening, the industry's largest...Read More »

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